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World Economy Review - March 2017

RTS Index

RTS Index

Global debt rose to 325 per cent of the world`s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2016, totaling $215 trillion (172.39 trillion pounds), an Institute for International Finance (IIF) report showed, boosted by the rapid growth of issuance in emerging markets.

Global debt grew by $7.6 trillion in 2016 compared with the prior year. Issuance rose from 320 per cent of GDP in 2015.

Emerging market debt saw a "spectacular rise" to $55 trillion outstanding in 2016, equal to 215 per cent of their GDP. This was driven mostly by non-financial corporate debt, the report said.

Emerging markets have raised nearly $40 trillion of new debt between 2006 and 2016, a significant acceleration from the roughly $9 trillion added between 1996 and 2006, according to the report.

Global debt has risen more than $70 trillion in the last decade to a record high for debt issuance, the institute said.

Developed market countries accounted for $160 trillion, the lion`s share of global debt, reaching nearly four times, or 390 per cent of those markets` combined GDP.

The report found that the $32 trillion increase in developed market debt had been driven largely by governments, with the US and UK public sector debt having more than doubled since 2006. Japan and developed markets in Europe have seen an increase of about 50 per cent in the dollar value of their outstanding government debt.

The majority of the increase in emerging market indebtedness has been in local currency, which was more than $48.5 trillion as of the end of 2016 from around $43 trillion...

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The World Economy

World GDP Growth, %

World GDP Growth

The world economy can be evaluated in various ways, depending on the model used, and this valuation can then be represented in various ways (for example, in 2006 US dollars). It is inseparable from the geography and ecology of Earth, and is therefore somewhat of a misnomer, since, while definitions and representations of the "world economy" vary widely, they must at a minimum exclude any consideration of resources or value based outside of the Earth.
For example, while attempts could be made to calculate the value of currently unexploited mining opportunities in unclaimed territory in Antarctica, the same opportunities on Mars would not be considered a part of the world economy - even if currently exploited in some way - and could be considered of latent value only in the same way as uncreated intellectual property, such as a previously unconceived invention. Beyond the minimum standard of concerning value in production, use, and exchange on the planet Earth, definitions, representations, models, and valuations of the world economy vary widely.

It is common to limit questions of the world economy exclusively to Human economic activity, and the world economy is typically judged in monetary terms, even in cases in which there is no efficient market to help valuate certain goods or services, or in cases in which a lack of independent research or government cooperation makes establishing figures difficult. Typical examples are illegal drugs and prostitution, which by any standard are a part of the world economy, but for which there is by definition no legal market of any kind.

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Monthly Average
for March 2017

indicatorvaluechange, %
Dow Jones20823.061.90%
RTS Index1101.69-4.83%
RUR/USD rate57.89-0.99%
RUR/EUR rate61.91-0.56%
OIl (Brent), $/bl52.57-6.19%
Oil (WTI), $/bl49.71-7.03%
Gold, $/oz1231.09-0.26%

Macroeconomic news